Cassia angustifolia  
 

 

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Botanical Name : Cassia angustifolia
Common Name : 
Cassia
Distribution :
Cassia is native to tropical Africa and cultivated in Egypt, India, Pakistan, Thailand.
Description :
Cassia is a shrubby plant that reaches 0.5–1, rarely two meters in height with a branched, pale-green erect stem and long spreading branches bearing four or five pairs of leaves. These leaves form complex, feathery, mutual pairs. The leaflets vary from 4 to 6 pairs, fully edged, with a sharp top. The midribs are equally divided at the base of the leaflets. The flowers are in a raceme interior [verification needed] blossoms, big in size, colored yellow that tends to brown. Its legume fruit are horned, broadly oblong, compressed and flat and contain about six seeds.
Part used : Leaves stems and pods.

Chemical components : In the leaf; sennosides A and B based on the aglycones sennidin A & B, senosides C & D which are glycosides of heterodianthrones of aloe-emodin and rhein are present. Others include palmidin A, rhein anthrone & aloe-emodin glycosides, some free anthraquinones and some potent, novel compounds of as yet undetermined structure. C.Senna usually contains more of the sennosides. In the fruit; sennosides A and B and a closely related glycoside sennoside A1. Naphthalene glycosides; tinnevellin glycoside & 6-hydroxymusizin glycoside Miscellaneous; mucilage, flavonoids, volatile oil, sugars, resins etc. one small, unripe, raw melon or about 50 ml of fresh juice, each taken in 2 or 3 doses over the course of the day. The only problem is that bitter melon tastes extremely bitter.
 

 

Action : Purgative, anthchiiintic, antipyretic, cathartic, laxative, vermifuge, diuretic.
Cassia is a powerful cathartic used in the treatment of constipation, working through a stimulation of intestinal peristalsis.

Dosage: Root infusion: - 2-20ml & powder 1-3 gm.
Therapeutic uses :
The medicinal action of Senna can be attributed mainly to the anthraquinone glycosides, especially sennoside A and B. It appears that the aglycone portion is responsible for its action. The breakdown of the anthraquinone glycosides in the digestive tract can occur in one of two ways. The bowel flora can directly hydrolyze themin a similar way to that of free active aglycone. Alternatively, in the presence of bile and the sugar moiety, the free aglycone can be absorbed into the blood stream and secreted later into the colon. The final result is stimulation of the Auerbach plexus resulting in increased intestinal muscle contraction. In addition, its mucilage content decreases bodily absorption of fluid leading to an enhancement of the final laxative action.

All herbs

Adenosma indianum - Aegle marmelos Correa - Aganosma marginata - Adenosma indianum - Allium satium - Allium tuberosum - Aloe vera - Alpinia galanga - Alpinia officinarum - Alstonia scholaris - Amomum krervanh - Andrographis paniculata - Arachis hypogaea - Boesenbergia pandurata - Bridelia burmanica - Canaga odorata - Capsicum annuum - Capsicum frutescens - Carica papaya - Carthamus tinctorius  - Cassia angustifolia - Cassia tora - Centella asiatica - Cinnamomum cassia - Clitoria ternatea - Coriandrum sativum - Curcuma Longa - Cymbopogon citratus - Eclipta prostrata - Elettaria cardamomum - Equisetum arvense  - Ganoderma lucidum - Ginkgo biloba - Glycine max - Hibiscus rosa-sinensis - Illicium verum - Jasmine - Lycium barbarum - Medicago sativa - Momordica charantia - Morinda officinalis - Moringa oliefera - Myristica fragrans - Nelumbo nucifera - Ocymum basilicum - Panax ginseng - Perilla frutescens - Phaseolus vulgaris - Phyllanthus emblica - Piper nigrum - Plumeria alba - Plantago ovata - Ricinus - Sesamum indicum - Styrax tonkinense - Sassafras - Terminalia chebula  - Tribulus terrestris  - Zingiber officinale

Resources
:
- Lavit KHAM  B.Sc (Chemistry),B.Pharm, MPS,MAACP, MNHAA
Medicinal Plants of Cambodia Habitat, Chemical constituents and Ethno botanical Uses
Bendigo Scientific Press  – ISBN 0-646-43703-8  / 9780646437033
- Somanith BOUAMANIVONG & Onvilay SOURIYA – Ministry of Health, Traditional Medicine Research Center, Editor Prof. Dr. Bouhong SOUTHAVONG, Vientiane 2005.
- Lily, M. PERRY. Medicinal Plants of East and Southeast Asia, London, England 1978
- WHO Regional Publications, Western Pacific Series No 2
- Jules VIDAL, Noms vernaculaires de plantes (LAO, MEO, KHA) 1959
- Medicinal Plants in China 1989
- C. Pierce SALGUERO – A Thai Herbal, Traditional Recipes for Health and Harmony, 2005
Silkworm Books www.silkwormbooks.info  – ISBN 974-9575-74-1 

Acknowledgements:
- Dr. Sabine WILKINS Plant Physiology & Dr. Pauline Mc CABE Naturopathy, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria Australia.
-
Prof. Roger KING, Pharmacology Toxicology, Monash University, Australia.
-
Chea SOK MENG, Cambodian pharmacist
-
Prof, Ka SUNBAUNAT Cambodian psychiatrist, Vice Dean, Faculty of Medicine, Phnom Penh.

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